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Safety Reminders for Tropical Storm Nicole Recovery

The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) urges first responders, folks in restoration efforts, and residents in areas affected by Tropical Storm Nicole to pay attention to the numerous hazards that flooding, energy loss, structural injury, fallen bushes and storm particles could create.

While the storm got here ashore as a class one hurricane, it weakened to a tropical storm and later a post-tropical cyclone, because it moved up Florida’s west coast.

Storm restoration could contain hazards associated to restoring electrical energy and communications, eradicating particles, repairing water injury, repairing or changing roofs and trimming bushes. Only folks with correct coaching, tools and expertise ought to conduct restoration and cleanup actions.

In climate disasters, OSHA recommends the next protective measures:

• Evaluate the work space for hazards.

• Assess the steadiness of buildings and strolling surfaces.

• Ensure fall safety when engaged on elevated surfaces.

• Assume all energy strains are stay.

• Operate chainsaws, transportable mills, ladders, and different tools correctly.

• Use private protecting tools, comparable to gloves, laborious hats, listening to, foot and eye safety.

“First responders, recovery workers and others engaged in storm cleanup can reduce the risks of injuries, illnesses and fatalities with the proper knowledge, safe work practices and appropriate personal protective equipment,” says OSHA Regional Administrator Kurt Petermeyer in Atlanta.

OSHA maintains a complete web site with security tips to assist employers and employees, together with tips on holding employees protected throughout flood cleanup. Individuals concerned in response and restoration efforts could name OSHA’s toll-free hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742).

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are liable for offering protected and healthful workplaces for his or her staff. OSHA’s position is to assist guarantee these circumstances for America’s working women and men by setting and implementing requirements, and offering coaching, schooling and help. For info, go to http://www.osha.gov.


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