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Earthquake security tips, preparation, and readiness

Earthquakes recurrently rattle our planet, placing somewhere in the world every hour of every day. Such occasions are the results of the slow-motion march of tectonic plates that construct stresses in Earth’s crust and higher mantle. Eventually the stress hits a breaking level and releases in a ground-shaking quake that may ship blocks of the Earth careening misplaced.

Most temblors are too small for people to really feel, however occasionally a whopper will rock our planet. The majority of earthquakes happen close to the boundaries of tectonic plates—just like the mighty San Andreas fault that runs alongside the United State’s west coast—however scientists nonetheless can’t say exactly the place and when the following large quake will strike. So in the event you’re in a area liable to shaking, it’s finest to be ready. Here are some tips to maintain you secure.

Before the quake

One necessary technique to put together for a temblor is to attempt to make your own home as secure as doable. For previous properties, it’s a good suggestion to research whether or not it complies with native constructing codes and establish potential weaknesses. FEMA has some handy guides to help steer you thru the basics of earthquake-resistant design and building.

The stuff inside your own home is simply as necessary because the partitions themselves. Take a tour of every room to look for things that could fall or break if the bottom begins to wobble. Sometimes this may be solved with a bit of reorganization, shifting massive or heavy objects to decrease cabinets. Other occasions fixing points takes a bit extra handiwork, akin to bolting bookcases to wall studs, putting in latches on cabinets, and securing any massive home equipment like water heaters.

While inspecting your own home, be sure to know tips on how to shut off your utilities. And when you’re at it, take a look at the connections of gasoline home equipment; it’s finest if these are flexible rather than rigid to allow them to bend with the rolling floor.

Assemble an earthquake emergency package that features meals, water, and different provides for a minimum of 72 hours. When getting ready your package, take into account every member of your loved ones and their wants—and don’t forget your pets. The Department of Homeland Security has a detailed guide about placing collectively a package for a lot of completely different contingencies.

<p>Search-and-rescue groups survey the rubble in Amatrice, Italy, following a magnitude 6.2 earthquake.</p>

01-italy-earthquake

Search-and-rescue groups survey the rubble in Amatrice, Italy, following a magnitude 6.2 earthquake.

Photograph by Massimo Percossi, EPA

When the shaking begins

Protect your self as shortly as doable. In many situations that means remembering three actions: drop, cowl, and maintain.

Drop: Get down in your fingers and knees to guard your self from being knocked over. That additionally places you in a super place to crawl for shelter.

Cover: Place an arm and hand over your head and neck to protect them from particles. Head for any close by tables to shelter underneath till the shaking stops. If a desk isn’t in sight, sidle as much as one in every of your own home’s inside partitions away from tall objects and furnishings that may topple. A standard false impression in searching for cowl is that doorways supply the most effective safety throughout an earthquake. But according to the Earthquake Country Alliance, that is solely true in case you are in an “old, unreinforced adobe house.” In fashionable properties, the remainder of the home is simply as sturdy.

Hold: Stay put till the shaking stops. If you’re underneath a shelter like a desk, hold maintain of it with one hand. If you’re out within the open, proceed to protect your head and neck together with your arms.

If you utilize a wheelchair or walker, or can not drop to the bottom, there are other versions of the above protocol to follow that will help keep you safe. For instance, in case you are in a wheelchair, lock the wheels after which lean over to guard your important organs, overlaying your head and neck together with your arms.

When the bottom begins to roll underneath your toes, resist the temptation to run exterior. Instead, take cowl in place. But in case you are already open air, keep exterior and transfer away from buildings and energy strains. If you’re driving, pull off the street. But do not stop under an overpass or different construction that would crash down.

Coastal quakes may be notably harmful because the shifting floor can disturb the water column and produce a tsunami. If you’re on a coast when a powerful earthquake strikes, get to larger floor as quickly as you possibly can.

While tsunami warning programs may help give some discover, it’s usually too dangerous to attend for the alert to get to excessive floor. For one, the time between the siren and the wave crashing onshore could also be small. And if the tsunami is native, it would evade warning system detection completely. For instance, a surprise tsunami devastated parts of Indonesia in 2018, thanks partially to the actual geometry of the channel that funneled the water to land. What’s extra, as was the case in Indonesia’s 2018 tsunami, cellphone towers toppled by the shaking can stop transmission of potential alerts.

After the shaking subsides

Even after the bottom grows nonetheless, the hazard is just not essentially over. As the Earth settles from its trembling it might probably produce a sequence of smaller quakes generally known as aftershocks. On uncommon events, a second earthquake that’s even larger than the primary would possibly comply with. When that occurs, the primary quake is named a foreshock, and the second temblor is named a important shock. This was the case for the 2 massive earthquakes—a magnitude 6.4 adopted by a magnitude 7.1 occasion—that rocked California in the summer of 2019.

Still, as soon as the shaking subsides it’s time to start out getting your self and others prepared for extra. First, verify for accidents. Sometimes folks received’t initially really feel ache due to the adrenaline that programs by the physique throughout life-threatening occasions. Next, verify the gasoline and electrical strains, and switch them off if you are able to do so safely. And in case you are inside a closely broken construction, get your self and others out as quickly as doable.

If you’re trapped, keep calm. Protect your mouth, nostril, and eyes from the mud and name or textual content for assist. Make noise by whistling or shouting to get responders’ consideration. But in case you are exterior, hold a watch out for hazards like fallen electrical strains, ruptured gasoline pipes, or precarious constructions.

Turn on the radio—maybe one you stowed in your earthquake emergency package—and pay attention for updates. Heed warnings and directions from official organizations just like the United States Geological Survey, and watch out about what you see shared on social media. Falsehoods unfold like wildfire in emergency conditions. To let your loved ones and associates know all is effectively—or to verify for the standing of your personal family members—head to the Red Cross’ Safe and Well website.

The unpredictability of earthquakes is horrifying, however with a bit of preparation, you may be prepared if an enormous one strikes.

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Such events are the result of the slow-motion march of tectonic plates that build stresses in Earth’s crust and upper mantle. Eventually the stress hits a breaking point and releases in a ground-shaking quake that can send blocks of the Earth careening out of place.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html1″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”Most temblors are too small for humans to feel, but every so often a whopper will rock our planet. The majority of earthquakes occur near the boundaries of tectonic plates—like the mighty San Andreas fault that runs along the United State’s west coast—but scientists still can’t say precisely where and when the next big quake will strike. So if you’re in a region prone to shaking, it’s best to be prepared. Here are some tips to keep you safe.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html2″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”Before the quake“,”type”:”h2″,”id”:”html3″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”One important way to prepare for a temblor is to try to make your home as safe as possible. For old homes, it’s a good idea to investigate whether it complies with local building codes and identify potential weaknesses. FEMA has some handy guides to help steer you through the fundamentals of earthquake-resistant design and construction.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html4″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”The stuff inside your home is just as important as the walls themselves. Take a tour of each room to look for things that could fall or break if the ground starts to wobble. Sometimes this can be solved with a little reorganization, moving large or heavy objects to lower shelves. Other times fixing issues takes a bit more handiwork, such as bolting bookcases to wall studs, installing latches on cupboards, and securing any large appliances like water heaters.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html5″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”While inspecting your home, make sure you know how to shut off your utilities. And while you’re at it, check out the connections of gas appliances; it’s best if these are flexible rather than rigid so they can bend with the rolling ground.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html6″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”Assemble an earthquake emergency kit that includes food, water, and other supplies for at least 72 hours. When preparing your kit, consider each member of your family and their needs—and don’t forget your pets. The Department of Homeland Security has a detailed guide about putting together a kit for many different contingencies.”,”type”:”p”,{“id”:”inline-1″,”cntnt”:”aspectRatio”:”3×2″,”cmsType”:”photogallery”,”id”:”inline-1″,”media”:[“caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Massimo Percossi, EPA”,”text”:”

Search-and-rescue teams survey the rubble in Amatrice, Italy, following a magnitude 6.2 earthquake.

n”,”title”:”01-italy-earthquake”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5003663003663004,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ce70de3d-e138-4e08-a3ae-464c310e7593/01-italy-earthquake.jpg”,”altText”:”

Search-and-rescue teams survey the rubble in Amatrice, Italy, following a magnitude 6.2 earthquake.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Massimo Percossi, EPA”,”dsc”:”epa05508246 Search and rescue teams survey the rubble in Amatrice, central Italy, 24 August 2016, following a 6.2 magnitude earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), that struck at around 3:30 am local time (1:30 am GMT). The quake was felt across a broad section of central Italy, including the capital Rome where people in homes in the historic center felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. According to reports at least 21 people died in the quake, 11 in Lazio and 10 in Marche regions. EPA/MASSIMO PERCOSSI”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”01-italy-earthquake”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Remo Casilli, Reuters”,”text”:”

Rescue workers pull a man from the rubble in Amatrice.

n”,”title”:”01_italy_earthquake”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5386927122464313,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ce713d6-dffd-462e-9940-bb5b9758e107/01_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Remo Casilli, Reuters”,”dsc”:”A man is rescued alive from the ruins following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, August 24, 2016. REUTERS/Remo Casilli TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY – RTX2MSE4″,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”01_italy_earthquake”,”altText”:”

Rescue workers pull a man from the rubble in Amatrice.

n”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Alessandra Tarantino, AP”,”text”:”

Firefighters inspect a building damaged in the August 24 earthquake in central Italy.

n”,”title”:”03_italy_earthquake”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5003663003663004,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/75bdb243-2f53-4823-a856-5619fe47d5b8/03_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”altText”:”

Firefighters inspect a building damaged in the August 24 earthquake in central Italy.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Alessandra Tarantino, AP”,”dsc”:”Firefighters inspect a damaged building following an earthquake in Amatrice, central Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. A strong earthquake in central Italy reduced three towns to rubble as people slept early Wednesday, with reports that as many as 50 people were killed and hundreds injured as rescue crews raced to dig out survivors. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”03_italy_earthquake”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Massimo Percossi, ANSA/AP”,”text”:”

A man is pulled from the rubble in Amatrice.

n”,”title”:”10_italy_earthquake”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5003663003663004,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/47c66d4b-5451-4bc6-a161-3d0096e8e418/10_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”altText”:”

A man is pulled from the rubble in Amatrice.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Massimo Percossi, ANSA/AP”,”dsc”:”A man is pulled out of the rubble following an earthquake in Amatrice Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. (Massimo Percossi/ANSA via AP)”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”10_italy_earthquake”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by EPA”,”text”:”

Search-and-rescue teams survey the damage in Pescara del Tronto.

n”,”title”:”ITALY EARTHQUAKE”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5003663003663004,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/1d5f0388-eb7c-45fa-be5d-df7e29490858/02_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”altText”:”

Search-and-rescue teams survey the damage in Pescara del Tronto.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by EPA”,”dsc”:”epa05508280 Search and rescue teams survey the rubble of collapsed and damaged houses in Pescara del Tronto, near Arquata del Tronto municipality, Ascoli Piceno province, Marche Region, central Italy, 24 August 2016, following a 6.2 magnitude earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), that struck at around 3:30 am local time (1:30 am GMT). The quake was felt across a broad section of central Italy, including the capital Rome where people in homes in the historic center felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. According to reports at least 21 people died in the quake, 11 in Lazio and 10 in Marche regions. EPA/CROCCHIONI”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”ITALY EARTHQUAKE”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Giuseppe Bellini, Getty”,”text”:”

The earthquake damaged this road in Arquata del Tronto in central Italy.

n”,”title”:”05_italy_earthquake”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5003663003663004,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/7774536f-792c-439c-85fb-0cfb02a65455/05_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”altText”:”

The earthquake damaged this road in Arquata del Tronto in central Italy.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Giuseppe Bellini, Getty”,”dsc”:”ARQUATA DEL TRONTO, ITALY – AUGUST 24: Damaged road is seen on August 24, 2016 in Arquata del Tronto, Italy. Central Italy was struck by a powerful, 6.2-magnitude earthquake in the early hours, which has killed at least thirteen people and devastated dozens of mountain villages. Numerous buildings have collapsed in communities close to the epicenter of the quake near the town of Norcia in the region of Umbria, witnesses have told Italian media, with an increase in the death toll highly likely (Photo by Giuseppe Bellini/Getty Images)”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”05_italy_earthquake”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Massimo Percossi, EPA”,”text”:”

Rescue workers carry an injured woman from the rubble of collapsed buildings in Amatrice.

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Rescue workers carry an injured woman from the rubble of collapsed buildings in Amatrice.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Massimo Percossi, EPA”,”dsc”:”epaselect epa05508239 An injured woman (C) is carried by rescuers amid the rubble of collapsed buildings in Amatrice, central Italy, 24 August 2016, following a 6.2 magnitude earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), that struck at around 3:30 am local time (1:30 am GMT). The quake was felt across a broad section of central Italy, including the capital Rome where people in homes in the historic center felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. According to reports at least 21 people died in the quake, 11 in Lazio and 10 in Marche regions. EPA/MASSIMO PERCOSSI”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”04_italy_earthquake”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Angelo Carconi, EPA”,”text”:”

The earthquake damaged many buildings throughout central Italy. Here, a woman stands in front of a damaged house in Accumoli.

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The earthquake damaged many buildings throughout central Italy. Here, a woman stands in front of a damaged house in Accumoli.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Angelo Carconi, EPA”,”dsc”:”epa05508576 A view of collapsed and damaged houses after the earthquake in Accumoli, central Italy, 24 August 2016, following a 6.2 magnitude earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), that struck at around 3:30 am local time (1:30 am GMT). The quake was felt across a broad section of central Italy, in Umbria, Lazio and Marche Regions, including the capital Rome where people in homes in the historic center felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. According to reports at least 37 people died in the quake. EPA/ANGELO CARCONI”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”06_italy_earthquake”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Gregorio Borgia, AP”,”text”:”

This aerial photo shows the damaged buildings in central Amatrice. The mayor told local reporters much of the town was destroyed in the earthquake.

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This aerial photo shows the damaged buildings in central Amatrice. The mayor told local reporters much of the town was destroyed in the earthquake.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Gregorio Borgia, AP”,”dsc”:”This aerial photo shows the damaged buildings in the historical part of the town of Amatrice, central Italy, after an earthquake, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”07_italy_earthquake”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Alessandra Tarantino, AP”,”text”:”

Dozens of people were killed in the earthquake, and many more were injured or left homeless.

n”,”title”:”08_italy_earthquake”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5003663003663004,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/52fa178a-f4f8-4df0-8183-4239af077c5a/08_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”altText”:”

Dozens of people were killed in the earthquake, and many more were injured or left homeless.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Alessandra Tarantino, AP”,”dsc”:”People sit on the side of a road as collapsed buildings are seen in the background following an earthquake, in Amatrice, Italy, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The magnitude 6 quake struck at 3:36 a.m. (0136 GMT) and was felt across a broad swath of central Italy, including Rome where residents of the capital felt a long swaying followed by aftershocks. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”08_italy_earthquake”,”caption”:”credit”:”Photograph by Adamo Di Loreto, Sipa USA/AP”,”text”:”

This building in Pescara del Tronto was destroyed in the August 24 earthquake.

n”,”title”:”09_italy_earthquake”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5003663003663004,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/cd634d10-9904-4334-ad7c-51bf0d06e64b/09_italy_earthquake.jpg”,”altText”:”

This building in Pescara del Tronto was destroyed in the August 24 earthquake.

n”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Adamo Di Loreto, Sipa USA/AP”,”dsc”:”A destroyed building in Pescara del Tronto, Italy, on August 24, 2016. A powerful pre-dawn earthquake devastated mountain villages in central Italy on August 24, 2016, leaving at least 38 people dead and dozens more injured, trapped or missing. Scores of buildings were reduced to dusty piles of masonry in communities close to the epicentre of the quake, which had a magnitude of between 6.0 and 6.2, according to monitors. (Photo by Adamo Di Loreto/NurPhoto) *** Please Use Credit from Credit Field ***”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”09_italy_earthquake”],”disableFullscreen”:true,”hideTitle”:false,”hideDek”:false,”align”:”contentWidth”,”heading”:”Italy Earthquake Aftermath”,”size”:”small”,”theme”:”light”,”type”:”inline”},”id”:”html7″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”When the shaking starts“,”type”:”h2″,”id”:”html8″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”Protect yourself as quickly as possible. In many situations that means remembering three actions: drop, cover, and hold.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html9″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”• Drop: Get down on your hands and knees to protect yourself from being knocked over. That also puts you in an ideal position to crawl for shelter.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html10″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”• Cover: Place an arm and hand over your head and neck to shield them from debris. Head for any nearby tables to shelter under until the shaking stops. If a table isn’t in sight, sidle up to one of your home’s interior walls away from tall objects and furniture that might topple. A common misconception in seeking cover is that doorways offer the best protection during an earthquake. But according to the Earthquake Country Alliance, this is only true if you are in an “old, unreinforced adobe house.” In modern homes, the rest of the house is just as strong.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html11″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”• Hold: Stay put until the shaking stops. If you’re under a shelter like a table, keep hold of it with one hand. If you’re out in the open, continue to shield your head and neck with your arms.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”inline-2″,”cntnt”:”cmsType”:”pullquote”,”id”:”inline-2″,”quote”:”When the ground starts to shake remember three things: drop, cover, hold.”,”theme”:”dark”,”type”:”pull”,”hideIcon”:true,”type”:”inline”,”id”:”html12″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”If you use a wheelchair or walker, or cannot drop to the ground, there are other versions of the above protocol to follow that will help keep you safe. For example, if you are in a wheelchair, lock the wheels and then lean over to protect your vital organs, covering your head and neck with your arms.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html13″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”When the ground starts to roll under your feet, resist the temptation to run outside. Instead, take cover in place. But if you are already outdoors, stay outside and move away from buildings and power lines. If you are driving, pull off the road. But do not stop under an overpass or other structure that could crash down.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html14″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”Coastal quakes can be particularly dangerous since the shifting ground can disturb the water column and produce a tsunami. If you are on a coast when a strong earthquake strikes, get to higher ground as soon as you can.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html15″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”While tsunami warning systems can help give some notice, it’s often too risky to wait for the alert to get to high ground. For one, the time between the siren and the wave crashing onshore may be small. And if the tsunami is local, it might evade warning system detection entirely. For example, a surprise tsunami devastated parts of Indonesia in 2018, thanks in part to the particular geometry of the channel that funneled the water to land. What’s more, as was the case in Indonesia’s 2018 tsunami, cellphone towers toppled by the shaking can prevent transmission of potential alerts.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html16″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”After the shaking subsides“,”type”:”h2″,”id”:”html17″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”Even after the ground grows still, the danger is not necessarily over. As the Earth settles from its trembling it can produce a series of smaller quakes known as aftershocks. On rare occasions, a second earthquake that’s even bigger than the first might follow. When that happens, the first quake is called a foreshock, and the second temblor is called a main shock. This was the case for the two large earthquakes—a magnitude 6.4 followed by a magnitude 7.1 event—that rocked California in the summer of 2019.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html18″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”Still, once the shaking subsides it’s time to start getting yourself and others ready for more. First, check for injuries. Sometimes people won’t initially feel pain because of the adrenaline that courses through the body during life-threatening events. Next, check the gas and electric lines, and turn them off if you can do so safely. And if you are inside a heavily damaged structure, get yourself and others out as soon as possible.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html19″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”If you’re trapped, stay calm. Protect your mouth, nose, and eyes from the dust and call or text for help. Make noise by whistling or shouting to get responders’ attention. But if you are outside, keep an eye out for hazards like fallen electrical lines, ruptured gas pipes, or precarious structures.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html20″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”Turn on the radio—perhaps one you stowed in your earthquake emergency kit—and listen for updates. Heed warnings and instructions from official organizations like the United States Geological Survey, and be careful about what you see shared on social media. Falsehoods spread like wildfire in emergency situations. To let your family and friends know all is well—or to check for the status of your own loved ones—head to the Red Cross’ Safe and Well website.”,”type”:”p”,”id”:”html21″,”cntnt”:”mrkup”:”The unpredictability of earthquakes is frightening, but with a little preparation, you can be ready if a big one strikes.”,”type”:”p”],”cid”:”drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:d50acf1f-805f-45fa-ade9-458d94419085″,”cntrbGrp”:[“contributors”:[“displayName”:”Maya Wei-Haas”],”title”:”By”,”rl”:”Writer”],”mode”:”richtext”,”dscrptn”:”Temblors frequently strike around the world. These suggestions will help you prepare for the next quake that might rattle your town.”,”enableAds”:true,”endbug”:true,”isMetered”:true,”isUserAuthed”:false,”ldMda”:”cmsType”:”image”,”hasCopyright”:true,”id”:”ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3″,”lines”:3,”positionMetaBottom”:true,”showMore”:true,”caption”:”

Tourists pose in front of a collapsed building that serves as a memorial to the people who died in the 2008 earthquake that struck Wenchuan, Sichuan Province, China.

n”,”credit”:”Photograph by Ambroise Tézenas, INSTITUTE”,”image”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.2503052503052503,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg”,”altText”:”the Sichuan Wenchuan earthquake ruins in Yingxiu, China”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ambroise Tézenas, INSTITUTE”,”dsc”:”Sichuan Wenchuan earthquake ruins tour ? China Experience witness the damages of the deadliest Wenchuan earthquake in recent history It is known to us, the day on May 12th, 2008 brought great misfortune to Sichuan people and to the whole China. Everyone in the world was astonished by the gigantic earthquake happened in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province. The houses were destroyed and a large number of people lost their life. This tour will offer you a chance to experience places where the earthquake happened and to have a look at the situation after the tremendous earthquake. I am a tourguide, my name is Zhongwen ( male, speaking German and English, a little French, worked 22 years in travel agent, manager of Sichuan China Travel Service, the eldest and biggest travel agent in Chengdu), the driver names Wu. Source: Sichuan Travel Service, China. We arrive in Yingxiu town and take pictures for Xuankou middle school (about 53 died), Xuankou grade school ( about 250 died)”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Sichuan Wenchuan earthquake ruins”,”imageAlt”:”the Sichuan Wenchuan earthquake ruins in Yingxiu, China”,”imageSrc”:[“sources”:”x1″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=374&h=299″,”x2″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=748&h=598″,”media”:”(max-width: 374px)”,”sources”:”x1″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=413&h=330″,”x2″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=826&h=660″,”media”:”(max-width: 413px)”,”sources”:”x1″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=636&h=509″,”x2″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=1272&h=1018″,”media”:”(min-width: 414px)”],”hideEndBug”:true,”type”:”imageLead”,”hideLine”:true,”deferImages”:false,”mdDt”:”2021-05-03T17:31:39.431Z”,”pbDt”:”2019-09-12T16:30:00.000Z”,”readTime”:”7 min read”,”schma”:”athrs”:[“name”:”Maya Wei-Haas”],”cnnicl”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/article/earthquake-safety-tips”,”kywrds”:”earthquakes safety earth quakes natural disasters aftershocks tectonic plates fault california seismic, earthquakes, safety, plate tectonics, natural disasters and hazards, earth”,”lg”:”https://assets-cdn.nationalgeographic.com/natgeo/static/default.NG.logo.dark.jpg”,”pblshr”:”National Geographic”,”abt”:”Earthquakes”,”sclDsc”:”Temblors frequently strike around the world. These suggestions will help you prepare for the next quake that might rattle your town.”,”sclImg”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/9ca6feff-eec2-4d6b-9a76-9b3227f1ac72/21_16x9.jpg?w=1200″,”sclTtl”:”Earthquake safety tips, preparation, and readiness”,”sctn”:”Environment”,”sctnLbls”:[“name”:”Environment”,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment”,”name”:”Reference”,”type”:”genres”],”shrURLs”:”fbIcon”:”facebook”,”fb”:”https://www.facebook.com/sharer.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nationalgeographic.com%2Fenvironment%2Farticle%2Fearthquake-safety-tips”,”fbAriaLabel”:”article.facebookShare.ariaLabel”,”fbLabel”:”article.facebookShare.label”,”fbButtonTracking”:”event_name”:”share”,”share_content_type”:”article”,”content_title”:”earthquake safety tips, preparation, and readiness”,”share_method”:”facebook”,”emailIcon”:”email__filled”,”email”:”mailto:?subject=Earthquake%20safety%20tips%2C%20preparation%2C%20and%20readiness&body=Temblors%20frequently%20strike%20around%20the%20world.%20These%20suggestions%20will%20help%20you%20prepare%20for%20the%20next%20quake%20that%20might%20rattle%20your%20town.%0A%0Ahttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.nationalgeographic.com%2Fenvironment%2Farticle%2Fearthquake-safety-tips”,”emailLabel”:”Email”,”emailButtonTracking”:”event_name”:”share”,”share_content_type”:”article”,”content_title”:”earthquake safety tips, preparation, and readiness”,”share_method”:”email”,”twitter”:”https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nationalgeographic.com%2Fenvironment%2Farticle%2Fearthquake-safety-tips&text=Earthquake%20safety%20tips%2C%20preparation%2C%20and%20readiness&via=NatGeo”,”twitterLabel”:”Tweet”,”twitterButtonTracking”:”event_name”:”share”,”share_content_type”:”article”,”content_title”:”earthquake safety tips, preparation, and readiness”,”share_method”:”twitter”,”title”:”Earthquake safety tips”,”wrdcnt”:1292}]}],”cmsType”:”ArticleBodyFrame”},”id”:”email-sticky-footer-frame1″,”mods”:[“id”:”466c63e8-96c0-48f6-b48e-26ec8787bea9″,”cmsType”:”StackModule”,”align”:”left”,”edgs”:[“id”:”86d7bec4-ff47-4a76-aad9-768e22bbfed3″,”cmsType”:”EmailStickyFooterTile”,”title”:”Enter your email address to continue reading”,”errorMessage”:”Please enter a valid e-mail address”,”mrktngMeta”:”cpgnCd”:”20220823_global_email wall_environment”,”subtitle”:”Stay up to date on our ever-changing earth.”,”success”:”description”:”

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You’ll find it on our annual list of the world’s best destinations for travelers.”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/aae9ac0a-495f-4aba-bfe5-b3414bfe7b14/MM9751_210807_04462.jpg”,”altText”:”An aerial view of Karpathos and the surrounding sea”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ciril Jazbec, National Geographic”,”dsc”:”The hike to the most important ancient city of Vroukounda: Starting from Avlona, the most important agriculture place, where you follow a path which is more than 2000 years old. The total distance is 4.00 km and it takes 2.5 hours. The whole island has been characterized as a Site of Community Importance for the birds of Greece according to the directive 79/409/EEC, hosting various rare and endemic species of animals and plants and being of significant archaeological value. Both Karpathos and Saria are the most suitable areas for threatened species of undersea fauna and birdlife to live and develop thanks to their geomorphology. The Rocky caves of the coasts are home to the Mediterranean seal Monachus Monachus. In the coastal rocks, there are nests of Eleonora’s falcon and Audouin’s Gull. Saria also hosts an important part of rare predators such as Bonelli’s eagle, the long-legged buzzard (Buteo rufinus) and Eleonora’s falcon. The protected area is also of great archaeological interest. In the ancient towns of Vroukounda and Nisyros, there are tens of underground graves, ruins of walls and forts, part of the Hellenistic walls, but there are also Byzantine monuments, as those towns were inhabited until the 7th century AD. Evangelia is running Ecotourism Karpathos. Evangelia – Marina is a native of Karpathos. She has studied Geography at the University of the Aegean (2006-2010) and then completed a master’s courses on the “Environment and Development” at the National Technical University of Athens (2010-2012) and “Travel and Tourism” (2016-2017). After finishing her studies, taking into consideration the tough financial situation in Greece, she has been faced with the dilemma of moving abroad. Her enormous love for Karpathos prevailed and so she has got the big decision to live permanently on the island. She has decided to start programmes of ecotourism with the aim to transfer the love and respect she feels for her place to the visitors, but also to create the experiences which will help them be integrated into the local community as equal members. Avlona is part of a few important eco trails in Karpathos. Ony few people live in Avlona now but it used to be important town year ago for farming since it has a very unique location. The agricultural village of Avlona is one of the most northern villages of Karpathos, on the western slope of a bare mountain. At first sight Avlona looks like a deserted settlement from the western movies, but the village is located in a fertile valley. In the spring there is lush vegetation here, only during hot summer months dries out the vegetation and some neglected gardens here. In the area of Avlona there are more than 250 farmhouses, and the locals primarily produces here wheat and barley. In the old times those grains were taken to the windmills of Olymbos where were milled into flour. Avlona is currently the northernmost village in Karpathos that is accessible by automobile, and is accessible only via Olympos or Diafani. At the end of the Avlona road, there are hiking trails which lead to the ancient coastal settlement of Vrykountas, as well as the next village to the north, Tristomo (which is currently only accessible either by foot via Avlona or Diafani, or by boat via Diafani).”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ratio”:”3×2″,”isFeatured”:true,”sections”:[“name”:”Travel”,”id”:”432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel”,”name”:”Best of the World”,”id”:”f0112538-c9b6-3962-9abd-82e01db87c42″,”type”:”series”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/topic/best-of-the-world-hub”],”headline”:”25 breathtaking places and experiences for 2023″,”link”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/best-of-the-world-2023″,”description”:”Tales of the undead and other frights are found throughout history. But where did these stories come from?”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5003663003663004,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c1c9cc2c-bcc3-485c-9e8e-04bc2d8339c5/Undead19.jpg”,”altText”:”Bran Castle in Romania”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Kanuman/Shutterstock”,”dsc”:”Bran Castle in Romania may have served as inspiration for Dracula’s castle in Bram Stoker’s famous vampire novel, Dracula.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Vampires or OPENER, tighter crop on opener for vertical, or crop to horizontal”,”sections”:[“name”:”History Magazine”,”id”:”9e8034f6-2e16-3b86-998b-56f8ff9dffb7″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/magazine”],”headline”:”Tracing the origins of vampires, zombies, and werewolves”,”link”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/history/history-magazine/article/tracing-the-origins-of-vampires-zombies-and-werewolves”,”description”:”This cavern’s blind aquatic salamanders inspire legends and conservation efforts.”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5003663003663004,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/c95a730f-3d31-4ed8-b3de-0b74737f2899/resized-2BNJX19.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Nature Picture Library, Alamy Stock Photo”,”dsc”:”Olm (Proteus anguinus) a blind cave salamander species. Captive, Slovenia.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Slovenian Olm”,”sections”:[“name”:”Travel”,”id”:”432c4f83-2d55-3974-b95f-a221c87c0fd1″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel”],”headline”:”See a real ‘house of dragons’ in this Slovenian cave”,”link”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/this-slovenian-cave-is-the-real-house-of-baby-dragons”,”description”:”Filling a long-standing gap in feline research, a small study shows that cats can distinguish their owners’ voices from those of strangers.”,”img”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.5027883768711476,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861″,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/964c9c1c-c745-450b-8e4a-15ce337e05af/NationalGeographic_1468861.jpg”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic Photo Ark”,”dsc”:”A studio portrait of a domestic house cat named Rocket.”,”ext”:”jpg”,”sections”:[“name”:”Animals”,”id”:”fa010584-7bbf-3e92-90f9-586bb27fce94″,”type”:”sources”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals”,”name”:”Domesticated”,”id”:”d11b7061-fe2d-309b-b137-6cfe5be51c49″,”type”:”series”,”uri”:”https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/topic/pets”],”headline”:”Your cat can recognize your voice. 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Tourists pose in front of a collapsed building that serves as a memorial to the people who died in the 2008 earthquake that struck Wenchuan, Sichuan Province, China.

n”,”credit”:”Photograph by Ambroise Tézenas, INSTITUTE”,”image”:”crps”:[“nm”:”raw”,”aspRto”:1.2503052503052503,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg”,”nm”:”16×9″,”aspRto”:1.7777777777777777,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_16x9.jpg”,”nm”:”3×2″,”aspRto”:1.5,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_3x2.jpg”,”nm”:”square”,”aspRto”:1,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_square.jpg”,”nm”:”2×3″,”aspRto”:0.6666666666666666,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_2x3.jpg”,”nm”:”3×4″,”aspRto”:0.75,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_3x4.jpg”,”nm”:”4×3″,”aspRto”:1.3333333333333333,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_4x3.jpg”,”nm”:”2×1″,”aspRto”:2,”url”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china_2x1.jpg”],”rt”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china”,”src”:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg”,”altText”:”the Sichuan Wenchuan earthquake ruins in Yingxiu, China”,”crdt”:”Photograph by Ambroise Tézenas, INSTITUTE”,”dsc”:”Sichuan Wenchuan earthquake ruins tour ? China Experience witness the damages of the deadliest Wenchuan earthquake in recent history It is known to us, the day on May 12th, 2008 brought great misfortune to Sichuan people and to the whole China. Everyone in the world was astonished by the gigantic earthquake happened in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province. The houses were destroyed and a large number of people lost their life. This tour will offer you a chance to experience places where the earthquake happened and to have a look at the situation after the tremendous earthquake. I am a tourguide, my name is Zhongwen ( male, speaking German and English, a little French, worked 22 years in travel agent, manager of Sichuan China Travel Service, the eldest and biggest travel agent in Chengdu), the driver names Wu. Source: Sichuan Travel Service, China. We arrive in Yingxiu town and take pictures for Xuankou middle school (about 53 died), Xuankou grade school ( about 250 died)”,”ext”:”jpg”,”ttl”:”Sichuan Wenchuan earthquake ruins”,”imageAlt”:”the Sichuan Wenchuan earthquake ruins in Yingxiu, China”,”imageSrc”:[“sources”:”x1″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=374&h=299″,”x2″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=748&h=598″,”media”:”(max-width: 374px)”,”sources”:”x1″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=413&h=330″,”x2″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=826&h=660″,”media”:”(max-width: 413px)”,”sources”:”x1″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=636&h=509″,”x2″:”https://i.natgeofe.com/n/ab654cdf-3cf5-477f-8a10-4ed55f892af3/sichuan-wenchuan-earthquake-ruins-china.jpg?w=1272&h=1018″,”media”:”(min-width: 414px)”],”hideEndBug”:true,”type”:”imageLead”,”hideLine”:true,”deferImages”:false,”mdDt”:”2021-05-03T17:31:39.431Z”,”wrdcnt”:1292,”story_id”:”drn:src:natgeo:unison::prod:d50acf1f-805f-45fa-ade9-458d94419085″},”request”:”headers”:,”httpVersion”:”1.1″,”method”:”GET”,”url”:”/environment/article/earthquake-safety-tips”,”vary”:”cached”:true,”device”:”pc”,”host”:”www.nationalgeographic.com”,”path”:”/environment/article/earthquake-safety-tips”,”forwarded-proto”:”https”,”country”:”us”,”edition”:”natgeo-en-us”,”edition-view”:”natgeo-en-us”,”loggedin”:”false”,”viewport”:”width”:1260,”height”:0,”scrollX”:0,”scrollY”:0,”user”:};

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